Privacy & Identity: Why It Matters

All the latest news and analysis covering the changing P&I landscape.
Updated regularly by the subject leaders at TripleLift.
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How Advertisers Can Reap the Benefits of Data Clean Rooms

Data clean room

Data clean rooms with advanced AI capabilities enrich publisher first-party data and give advertisers lookalike matches. This article explains how advertisers can redefine how they target and reach audiences.

Why it matters — AI-powered data clean rooms are putting advertisers in control of their first-party data for more accurate audience reach. With the continued deprecation of third-party cookies, advertisers need new ways to reach Safari and Firefox users in a privacy-compliant manner. Simultaneously, they need to improve their outcomes. AI-powered data clean rooms are a technology that advertisers can use to improve their targeting and prospecting. Data clean rooms powered by artificial intelligence (AI) are a new way to solve for data modeling needs to improve advertiser business objectives. This article explains how this technology works and how advertisers can take advantage.

Go deeper → — 6 Min read

Advertisers' Approaches to Cookieless Addressability

First-party data

When it comes to addressability, the industry needs to ask questions beyond the third-party cookie’s demise: What third-party data alternatives are available right now? What actions do advertisers need to take today? And what role does first-party data play?

Why it matters — The industry is abuzz with dialogue around addressability in a world without third-party cookies. The end of third-party cookies is merely the tip of the iceberg. This means simply replacing the third-party cookie with alternative cross-domain solutions is not the ultimate solution in the long term. Instead, advertisers need to delve deeper into the power of first-party data. Why? So they can work with their supply partners now, to experiment with and implement the changes necessary to prepare for a future without third-party cookies. And for the most part, advertisers still aren’t prepared: According to research conducted by TripleLift in partnership with AdAge, there’s distinct overconfidence among marketers that signals an industry-wide lack of preparedness. 84% of marketers were aware that change was coming. But 71% didn't feel the death of third-party cookies would significantly impact their digital ad purchasing behavior. The result? An action gap can be seen in the 69% that have yet to implement solutions.

Go deeper → — 5 Min read

Why Cross-Domain ID Solutions Won’t Replace Third-Party Cookies

Cross domain ID solutions

Cross-domain ID solutions — such as HEM (hashed email addresses) and fingerprinting — have seen increased attention across the industry. However, the majority of this attention is misplaced. Here’s why cross-domain ID solutions aren’t the ideal alternatives to a deprecated third-party cookie.

Why it matters — While Google has pushed back third-party cookie deprecation another year, finding viable solutions to address the industry’s needs in a post-third-party cookie world remains critical. But while some attention to cross-domain ID solutions may be warranted, it’s crucial to remember that the third-party cookie itself is a cross-domain identifier—and ultimately, it was this cross-domain characteristic that put third-party cookies in regulators’ crosshairs in the first place. Thus, the industry must continue experimenting with other solutions using opportunities such as the third-party cookieless environments that already exist in browsers like Safari and Firefox. In many ways, HEM and fingerprinting look like the logical heirs-apparent to the throne previously occupied by the third-party cookie: After all, they are both cookie-free solutions that can potentially enable marketers to keep doing many of the things that worked for them when the third-party cookie was king. But despite their apparent benefits, HEM and fingerprinting are problematic in ways that cast grave doubts on either ID solution’s ability to dominate a cookieless world.

Go deeper → — 10 Min read

Contextual Advertising Evolved — Advertisers Take Note

Contextual advertising

Old-school contextual advertising has evolved with new capabilities to improve ad performance, including audience segmentation, behavior, and engagement. This article covers what ad buyers need to know to start experimenting.

Why it matters — As third-party cookies are deprecated, advertisers need to explore alternative ways to purchase high-quality ad space. Contextual advertising is evolving with new opportunities for ad buyers to achieve an improved ROI. This isn’t the old-school contextual advertising where ads are simply matched to relevant content. In this new approach, buyers can use user behavior and engagement metrics to improve relevance. For ad buyers to blend this new approach with future media plans, they must understand the new capabilities and how to evaluate them.

Go deeper → — 6 Min read

Extending FLEDGE’s Wings to Embrace a Trusted Server for Audiences

Extending FLEDGE’s Wings to Embrace a Trusted Server for Audiences

Incorporating a trusted server into FLEDGE could safeguard privacy, give publishers more control of segments, and save the browser the headaches of auction mechanics. Here’s how this optional modification could work.

Why it matters — A trusted intermediary with a privacy gatekeeping function that sits between a device and ad tech buyers could be a game changer for publishers in a post-third-party-cookie world. As the industry debates the road ahead, incorporating the option of a Trusted Audience Server into the current version of Google Chrome’s FLEDGE proposal could produce significant upsides for multiple stakeholders. For example, auctions could be run on this trusted server rather than in the browser, and audience segments could also be stored on this server.

Go deeper → — 5 Min read

Measurement Without Third-Party Cookies

Cookieless measurement

As browsers and platforms deprecate third-party cookies, the opportunity for cookies to travel with the user as the user goes from one domain to another is no more, severing the browser infrastructure to measure ad effectiveness.

Why it matters — Because advertising requires cross-context activity, measuring effectiveness requires both contexts to contribute data in order to understand whether an ad was effective. But without third-party cookies traveling with the user from one domain to another, the browser infrastructure to measure ad effectiveness is no longer. The good news, measuring ad effectiveness is still possible without third-party cookies. It just looks a little different.

Go deeper → — 3 Min read